Sunday, December 29, 2013

CLAVDIA SAEPE ROGAS (ADVMBRATIO SECVNDA)

CLAVDIA SAEPE ROGAS, CLAVDENTES VNDE ORIANTVR
     VERSVS, CVR MVSAE VERSER IN ARTE LEVIS.
TV MIHI FIS CAVSAE RELIGANS MANANTIA AD ALNVM
     STRAGVLA CVM LALLAS, GAVDET ET OMNE NEMVS


Claudia, you often ask where my limping verses come from;
     why I engage in the art of a trivial muse.
You become their cause then, when, fastening the dripping sheets 
     up to an alder, you sing, and the entire grove rejoices.  

Saturday, December 28, 2013





CLAVDIA SAEPE ROGAS (ADVMBRATIO)

CLAVDIA SAEPE ROGAS CLAVDENTES VNDE ORIANTVR
     VERSVS, QVOR MVSAE VERSAR IN ARTE LEVIS?
ESTNE TVVS SERMO LEVIS; EST CREPITANTIBVS AVSTER
     ARBORIBVS LEVIS; EST MAGNVS ET ALTVS AMOR?
HAEC MIHI SVNT CAVSAE, LICET VT SVA MAENALA LVSTRENT        
     PAN FAVNIQVE; SONET FISTVLA PER NEMORA.
VRBS MEA, O, QVAMQVAM NEQVE GRANDIS NEC MEMORANDA
     MAENALA SIT MIHI; VOX ET MEA FISTVLA SIT.
DESINE MIRARI QVOR SIM SEMPER MEDITATVS
     VERSVS: NON SINE TE CARMINA MVSA DABIT.                               


Wednesday, December 25, 2013

                CLAUDIA SAEPE ROGAS CLAVDENTES VNDE ORIANTVR
                          VERSVS: NON SINE TE DISTICHA MVSA CANET
___
In aliis cod. pro "DISTICHA" legitur "CARMINA"

Claudia, you often ask me where my limping verses come from./ Without you, my Muse won't sing.



Saturday, July 06, 2013

Versus Elegiaci super domu nautarum


  Altum qui peragunt mare nautae, illîc habitabant
          Mensî caeruleam – veste madente – viam. 



Saturday, April 16, 2011

"They come dear son, to take our land" - Revision 5

adveniunt ut agrōs rapiant, dīlecte, paternōs
fīlī, iam in campōs agmina saeva adigunt.
pugnēmus itaque et lapidēs hōs, arripiāmus
rāmōs, extorta et corde ferōce valent!
oscula dā mātrī; claustrumque impōnere longum
dīc puerīs; et equās celsa ferant stabula!
lūceat adsiduē fulvus (nam spēcula nostrīs
cordibus ardēbit) igne micante focus!

They come dear son, to seize ancestral land;
now drive their savage throngs towards our fields.
And so let's fight, let's grasp these rocks,
these boughs: when hurled with valorous heart
they avail quite well for arms.

Kiss your mother, and tell the boys
to put the long bolt on the door;
to bring the mares to stables high,
and to keep the hearth (for a glimmer
of hope will continue to blaze in our hearts)
lit with glittering fire.

Sunday, April 03, 2011

Fragment, revised (iv)

adveniunt ut agrōs rapiant, dīlecte, paternōs
fīlī, iam in campōs agmina saeva adigunt.
pugnēmus itaque et lapidēs hōs, arripiāmus
rāmōs, extorta et corde ferōce valent!
oscula dā mātrī; claustrumque impōnere longum
dīc puerīs; et equās celsa ferant stabula!


They come, dear son, to take our land
and into fields lead savage troops.
And so let's fight, let's seize these rocks,
these boughs: if hurled with courageous heart,
they'll do quite well for arms.

Kiss your mother, tell the boys
to bolt the doors up tight;
make sure
they bring the mares to their high stables.

Friday, November 26, 2010




End of the Road
(based on Viva La Vida, by Coldplay)

Photo (detail): Margaret Bourke-White, 1944. Source: LIFE/Google


"Quondam omnēs gentēs diciōne sōlus
ūnicā rēxī, pelagusque nūtū
aestuat meō; placidē resēdit
dicta facessens.

Fortūnae in palmō positus superbō
hostium timens pavidumque sensī
pectus; victorem et populus canēbat:
'Aemule dīvīs,

iō!' saevō ingressus milite ōlim in urbēs
gemmārum et aurī rapiēbam acervōs
templa infracta et foedera fracta līquī
turbinis instar.

mox terrōre armīsque regō cruentīs
ossibus trītīs procerum corōna est
et cruōre facta thronusque fūsō
sanguine fultus.

Cārius praedīs caput esse opīmīs
ōra per vulgī volitat susūrrus
nōvī stāre mōbilibus deinde
rēgiam harēnīs."

tālī garrulus mihi fātus ōre
senex nunc verrens trivium celebre
quod tyrannus tum numerāret inter
spōlia regnī.

Translation:

"Once I alone ruled all nations
with unparalleled might
and the sea at my nod
swells; and - eager to do my bidding -
there! has settled down again.

Placed in Fortune's haughty palm,
I sensed the quaking, timid heart
of my enemy, and as victor
the people would hymn me:
"Hail, O Rival to the Gods!"

Once, I invaded cities with savage armies
and seized heaps of gems and gold,
broken temples, and broken treaties
I left behind, like a savage tornado.

Then with terror and by cruel arms I rule;
From the ground bones and the gore
of princes has my diadem been made
and my throne supported
on their spilled blood.

The whisper flits across the people's lips
that my head is dearer than rich plunder
Then I know my palace stands
on shifting sand."

With such words did the talkative
old man address me, as now he swept
the crowded public square -
which back then as monarch - so he claimed -
he reckoned as a prize of war.

Model:

I used to rule the world
Seas would rise when I gave the word
Now in the morning I sleep alone
Sweep the streets I used to own

I used to roll the dice
Feel the fear in my enemy's eyes
Listen as the crowd would sing:
"Now the old king is dead, Long live the king"

One minute I held the key
next the walls were closed on me
and I discovered that my castles stand
on pillars of salt ʻnʻ pillars of sand

[refrain 1]

It was the wicked and wild wind
blew down the doors to let me in
shattered windows and the sound of drums
people couldn't believe what I'd become

Revolutionaries wait
for my head on a silver plate
Just a puppet on a lonely string
Oh, who would ever want to be king?

[refrain 2 x 2]